3.21.2017

Dyer argues that if we use textual analysis alone, we risk a narrow understanding of representation- seeing representations as fixed within a text, ready for us as readers to draw out of the text, analyse, and then judge (in terms of their veracity/ accuracy/ truthfulness).

Dyer’s typography of representation offers a model that emphasises this idea of representation as process. We can use it to help us consider how representation constructs meaning at various stages in the process.

Dyer identifies 4 stages/ areas for us to consider:

1) Re-presentation
– media language in a media text conveys a representation; textual analysis (conventions of camerawork, mise-en-scene, lighting, and editing) help us understand how the representations in your text convey meaning.

2) Being representative of- How much have you used ‘types’ and thereby reinforced dominant representations of particular social group. For example, if your main subject is a British Asian Muslim woman, how does your representation relate to those found elsewhere in the media? (issues of gender and religion). To what extent are you reinforcing dominant ideas about this social group? To what extent are you challenging dominant discourses? Is this group often stereotyped in the media? How is your text offering a more informed, nuanced representation by providing a portrait of one person- not a type, but an individual with a unique and unstable, contradictory sense of self (as honest as possible, not least because you as filmmaker are acknowledging from the start that it can only ever be a mediated representation).


3. Who is responsible for the representation “that is, in the sense of speaking for and on behalf of”. Institutions creating a media text obviously influence representation. Consider representations of gender, ethnicity, religion…and the contentious issue of white middle class men doing much of the representing.

4. What does the audience think is being represented to them?Audiences can construct different readings of media texts than those intended by the texts producers. Stuart Hall’s reading positions (preferred, negotiated, oppositional, and aberrant) are useful here, as they offer a way for us to think about how individuals actually make meaning from media texts.

3.16.2017

RE-PRESENTATION 13W

In the exam you could be asked to analyse the use of 'representation' on one of your media texts.


It is important to remember that representation mean to RE-PRESENT, that is the media show us things a version of the truth, they can never show the truth.


TASK 1 


On a word document select the 'characters' from your video and/or and screen shot each main 'character'. Do the same for your AS magazine


TASK 2

Next you you need to decide what 'type' of character you have represented, generally there are just three 'types' as described below


Character Typing
There are three different kinds of character typing:
1. An archetype is a familiar character who has emerged from hundreds of years of fairytales and storytelling.
2. A stereotype is a character usually used in advertising and marking in order to sell a particular product to a certain group of people. They can also be used ‘negatively’ in the Media – such as ‘asylum seekers,’ or ‘hoodies’.
3. A generic type is a character familiar through use in a particular genre (type) of movie.


Explain which type of character(s) you have used and connect to existing texts (i.e. music videos or films)

TASK 3

Annotate you character screen shots with answers to the following questions (the codes referred to are narrative codes)


Key Questions about Specific Representations


What is being represented?
How is it represented? Using what codes? Within what genre?
How is the representation made to seem 'true', 'commonsense' or 'natural'?
Whose representation is it? Whose interests does it reflect? How do you know?
At whom is this representation targeted? How do you know?
What does the representation mean to you? What does the representation mean to others? How do you account for the differences?
How do people make sense of it? According to what codes?
With what alternative representations could it be compared? How does it differ?
reflexive consideration - Why is the concept of representation problematic?

Audience essay 13W

Analyse one of your media texts using audience theory. [25 marks]

Top Tips

P1. Always define the theory first - for audience establish what was the original belief - Blumer (Mass audience) and how we now have an active audience theory which operates through the decoding process of mode of address as well as an ethnographic approach.

P2. Identify your audience and what use/gratification they would take from the text - ensure you give multiple examples. Link this to UK tribes data.

P3. Apply active audience theory and give the preferred, oppositional and negotiated readings of your text - ensure you give multiple examples.

P4. Apply the ethnographic model (domestic, cultural and technological) to your text. Comment on the impact of where your text is available on the audience it would attract (domestic). Comment on what cultural knowledge (this links to Genre) you audience would need in order to understand your text. Comment on whether your audience would be information rich or information poor.



3.12.2017

Re-presentation 13X

In the exam you could be asked to analyse the use of 'representation' on one of your media texts.


It is important to remember that representation mean to RE-PRESENT, that is the media show us things a version of the truth, they can never show the truth.


TASK 1


On a word document select the 'characters' from your video and/or and screen shot each main 'character'. Do the same for your AS magazine


TASK 2

Next you you need to decide what 'type' of character you have represented, generally there are just three 'types' as described below


Character Typing
There are three different kinds of character typing:
1. An archetype is a familiar character who has emerged from hundreds of years of fairytales and storytelling.
2. A stereotype is a character usually used in advertising and marking in order to sell a particular product to a certain group of people. They can also be used ‘negatively’ in the Media – such as ‘asylum seekers,’ or ‘hoodies’.
3. A generic type is a character familiar through use in a particular genre (type) of movie.


Explain which type of character(s) you have used and connect to existing texts (i.e. music videos or films)

TASK 3

Annotate you character screen shots with answers to the following questions (the codes referred to are narrative codes)


Key Questions about Specific Representations


What is being represented?
How is it represented? Using what codes? Within what genre?
How is the representation made to seem 'true', 'commonsense' or 'natural'?
Whose representation is it? Whose interests does it reflect? How do you know?
At whom is this representation targeted? How do you know?
What does the representation mean to you? What does the representation mean to others? How do you account for the differences?
How do people make sense of it? According to what codes?
With what alternative representations could it be compared? How does it differ?
A reflexive consideration - Why is the concept of representation problematic?

3.08.2017

My Head Is A Jungle - Narrative



TASK 1

Watch the above music video and make notes between each screening focusing on

Roland Barthes: semiotic, cultural, enigma, action and symbolic narrative codes.
Mise en scene
Goodwin's theory: amplification, illustration, disjuncture.
Vernallis' theory: editing matches the music, editing matches the beat, fragmented 'narrative'.
Allan Rowe: “Narrative involves the viewer in making sense of what is seen, asking questions of what we see and anticipating the answers. In particular, narrative invites us to ask both what is going to happen next and when and how will it all end. Narrative operates on the tension between our anticipation of likely outcomes drawn from genre conventions and the capacity to surprise or frustrate our expectations.”
Intertextual references

TASK 2 - Deadline: Start of lesson Thursday March 8th

Using the video above, answer the question below on lined paper.   

In Question 1(b) you must write about one of your media coursework productions.
Apply the concept of narrative to one of your coursework productions. [25 marks]

Making Improvements - Genre and Narrative 13X

Use the marking codes and feedback sheets to identify where your responses are weakest.

TASK

Select one question from the list below and write your answer in 45 minutes

1b - Apply the theory of Genre to one of your products. [25 marks]
OR
1b - Apply narrative theories to one of your products. [25 marks]

Before handing in your work, do this:

The feedback sheet contains all the terminology and theory you should be using. Highlight where you have used this in your essay.

GENRE FEEDBACK

NARRATIVE FEEDBACK

3.07.2017

Examples for Question 1b Genre = 13X

The average mark for examples for the group is 5, this is due to the lack of examples for real media texts when discussing the genre of either your Music Video or your Music Magazine.

Today's Lesson - Next Step

Step 1
Find three videos from your genre which match the generic style of your video (i.e. performance, narrative, disjuncture or a hybrid of these). Sceen grab a shot from each

e.g. 





























Step 2
Find THREE examples from existing videos in your genre of:

Performance Star Image close up of lead singer 
Performance - whole band (if applicable)
Performance - singer (if applicable)
Performance - guitar (if applicable) 

Screen grab an example of each from the three videos and place them next to a screen grab of a similar shot from your own.

Step 3
Find THREE examples from existing videos in your genre of:
Style of band or artist (i.e. outfit/fashion)
Style of location (i.e. studio, external etc)

Screen grab an example of each from the three videos and place them next to a screen grab of a similar shot from your own.

Print off steps 1-3 and place in your work folder.

EXTENSION
Find any examples you can of INTENTIONAL intertextual references.

2.26.2017

Audience

The next theoretical approach is audience. To prevent you having to write yet more essays I have made a booklet.

Download the booklet.
Print it off.
Staple.
Complete it.

2.20.2017

2.05.2017

The Vixens AFL activity

Watch the video below and then read the accompanying 1b genre answer. Your task is to improve their response using appropriate genre theory.

Your second task is then to write a 30 minute 1b exam answer to the question below


"Analyse one of your media products using genre theory"






2.01.2017

I don't remember that either 13X and 13W

Today's lesson


Today you have ONE hour to print off and annotate 5 scenes from your A2 music video; scan it using the photocopier AND then upload it to this folder

So

1 - ANNOTATE
2 - SCAN
3 - UPLOAD


1. Screen grab from YouTube 5 key scenes from your music video and then ANNOTATE with the following:

Camera Angle (high/low)
Camera Shot
Mise en Scene
Lighting
Sound (lyrics/words)
Timing (shot duration)
Edit/transition
Amplification/disjuncture/illustration
Star Image

2. Go to the photocopier, SCAN IT IN

3. Upload to this folder

1.31.2017

13X Preparing your response

Before I mark your media language essay you need to prepare it for marking.

1. Attach the cover sheet to your essay
2. Using a highlighter (or underline) to identify every reference to media language.
3. Complete remaining tasks on the cover sheet.

Section A Question 13X

In Question 1 (a) you need to write about your work for the foundation portfolio and the Advanced Portfolio units and you may refer to other media production work you have undertaken.

1 (a) Explain the most significant ways in which your media productions were informed by your understanding of the conventions of real media texts. Refer to a range of examples in your answer to demonstrate how this understanding developed over time. [25]

What the examiner said

1a Stronger responses devoted equal time to AS and A2 productions (and other media production work if applicable) and clearly signposted progress over time throughout the answer. The distinction between general research and planning, production techniques and / or use of audience feedback and the strategic adoption or subversion of media conventions was the key distinguishing feature of level 4 answers. Top level answers also featured a range of specific textual examples at the ‘micro’ level rather than broad genre traits or the more obvious end of the scale of audience expectations. The strongest answers drew conclusions from carefully chosen examples from real media texts and explained how these informed decisions made. Many candidates chose to point out the value of real media texts but failed to explain examples in any detail. Most candidates provided evidence of the progression from AS to Advanced but tended to be restricted to an acknowledgement that progression had taken place in for the majority, bolted onto the end of the response without any further elaboration. 

1.20.2017

I don't remember 13W Period 3

Today's lesson


Today you have ONE hour to print off and annotate your AS magazine cover, contents and dps; scan it using the photocopier AND then upload it to this folder

So

1 - ANNOTATE
2 - SCAN
3 - UPLOAD


1. Print off your AS Magazine Cover, Contents and Double Page spread and then ANNOTATE with the following

Block quote: A long quotation - four or more lines - within body text, that is set apart in order to clearly distinguish the author’s words from the words that the author is quoting.
Byline: A journalist's name at the beginning of a story.
Caption: An identification (title) for an illustration, usually a brief phrase. The caption should also support the other content..
Centre of visual interest (CVI): The prominent item on a page usually a headline, picture or graphic.
Column: A regular feature often on a specific topic, written by the same person who is known as a columnist.
Column gutter: The space between columns of type.
Copy: Main text of a story.
Cropping: the elimination of parts of a photograph or other original that are not required to be printed. Cropping allows the remaining parts of the image to be enlarged to fill the space.
Deck: Part of the headline which summarises the story. Also known as deck copy or bank.
Drop cap: a large initial letter at the start of the text that drops into the line or lines of text below.
Filler: extra material used to complete a column or page, usually of little importance.
Flush left: copy aligned along the left margin.
Flush right: copy aligned along the right margin.
Golden ratio: the rule devised to give proportions of height to width when laying out text and illustrations to produce the most optically pleasing result. Traditionally a ratio of 1 to 1.6.
Headline: The main title of the article. Should be in present or future tense to add to urgency. Must fit the space provided. If it doesn’t, you are using the wrong words.
Masthead: Main title section and name at the front of a publication.
Negative space (or white space): the area of page without text, image or other elements
Orphan: First line of a paragraph appearing on the last line of a column of text. Normally avoided.
Overline: introductory headline in smaller text size above the main headline
Pull quote: A brief phrase (not necessarily an actual quotation) from the body text, enlarged and set off from the text with rules, a box, and/or a screen. It is from a part of the text set previously, and is set in the middle of a paragraph, to add emphasis and interest
Talkie headline: a quote from one of the people in the story used as a headline
Top heads: Headlines at the top of a column.
Wob: White text on a black or other coloured background

2. Go to the photocopier, SCAN IT IN

3. Upload to this folder